Why do we avoid gratitude?

A few months ago, I was having a conversation with my mentorship client about practices that ground here into her life. As we dove deep, it was uncovered that she avoids gratitude practice.

I could relate, and I’m guessing you may too. Gratitude practice at times feels like too much on top of our busy schedule. Plus, the word gratitude is used so much in new age culture that it’s true meaning is lost to our cynical side.

But that wasn’t the case for my client’s avoidance of gratitude practice.  I gave her a series of questions that helped her come to this conclusion:

She avoided gratitude practices because it made her feel good.

Why would one avoid to feel good?

Because, somewhere…deep inside of us we often believe that we don’t deserve to feel good.

Good is for someone else who deserves it more. Or that we don’t have time for good today. Or we relate so deeply to drama and being the victim that we actively push away good and feeling good.

Gay Hendricks writes about this idea in his book The Big Leap. Go out and read this text and then re-read it. I appreciate this concept so much that the book is on my nightstand all the time.

Lately, I’ve ramped up my gratitude practice. I did this by placing a very special object in my every day sight that reminds me to bow and give gratitude. I literally bow, put my hands in prayer position, and say thank you.

I definitely feel good doing this simple gratitude practice.

I can’t say gratitude practice cures all. Nor can I say that gratitude practices are for everyone.

But if you relate to gratitude as a gateway to your feeling good right now, I encourage you to find a way to remind yourself to give praise for your life.

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Gratitude isn’t magic, but it invites magic to be viewable from your eyes.

Thank you for reading this today.

Happy Thanksgiving to those of us who celebrate it, and may your days be full and inviting of all you desire.

With gratitude,

R o s e

 

 

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